Tag Archives: beef stock

Beating Sinus Congestion or Infection Naturally

Last weekend, I realized I had a sinus infection.  It caught me off guard because I had only had a bit of sinus congestion in the mornings – no cold or anything.  Saturday, it started off with this heavy pressure behind my eyes and ended with painful cheek bones, slight dizziness, and fatigue.

Because of my tendency toward Leaky Gut Syndrome, I avoid antibiotics as much as possible.  So I immediately turned to my arsenal of natural remedies.  Here is my list of simple things I incorporate into my day to bring relief and speed recovery by supporting my immune system anytime I have sinus congestion or infection:

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a great way to support our immune systems.  I choose sodium ascorbate over ascorbic acid since the latter is made from black mold, although some people prefer a whole food vitamin C.

I also like powder so I can have the option of putting it in capsules or mixing it with a drink.  Usually, I take about 1/2 teaspoon (which is about 4.5 grams sodium ascorbate) in grape juice twice daily.  I know that some people can take more, and they dose according to whatever amount causes loose stools then back down from that.  A friend was prescribed sodium ascorbate when she had whooping cough while pregnant, and she had great success with taking 16 grams daily!

Raw Apple Cider Vinegar

In my vitamin C drink, I add 1 tablespoon raw apple cider vinegar twice daily.  ACV is anti-bacterial, helps balance pH levels, and breaks up mucus.  It can also cause pretty significant yeast die-off symptoms in some, so I am sure to push lots of water and also take molybdenum and s. Boulardii to help ease the die-off symptoms.

Vitamin D3 and Vitamin K2

I also take 10,000-20,000 IU Vitamin D3 plus 1 gram K2 per day.  I split this between 5 drops Thorne Vitamin D3 with K2 (because if you take D3, you need K2, too) and 15,000 IU Healthy Origins Vitamin D3.  By the way, if I hadn’t been slacking on taking my D, maybe I wouldn’t have gotten sick in the first place last weekend!  Optimal D levels are crucial to immunity and gut health.

Essential Oils

I start diffusing essential oils.  Well, even more than usual. 😉  Head Ease (a blend of Basil, Chamomile, Frankincense, Lavender, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sweet Marjoram and Wintergreen) helps ease sinus pressure and soothe irritated nasal passages and respiratory tract.  Four Thieves and Lemon to help support my immune system and detox my lymphatic system.  If I have congestion, I use peppermint and massage (see below).

Sinus Rinse

I begin using a sinus rinse mixture in my Neti Pot at least a few times a day.  This helps pull out mucus and prevent infection.  If my sinuses are dry, which was the case this weekend, it moisturizes.  The mixture I use contains Xylitol, which has been shown to help relieve sinusitis faster than saline alone.

Sinus Rinse Mixture Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups spring water
  • 6 drops Grapefruit Seed Extract
  • 1/2 t baking soda
  • 1/2 t unrefined gray sea salt
  • 1 t Xylitol
  • 4 drops colloidal silver

Instructions

  1. Add ingredients to water in a sterile container.
  2. Shake well.
  3. Mix in Neti pot with 3 tablespoons hot water; adjust temperature as needed.  Be careful not to burn your sinuses!
  4. Use as needed.

Pain Relief

If I have pain in my sinuses or if I need help loosening up congestion, a warm rice pack (a cotton tube filled with rice – a cotton sock also works great) applied to those areas gives me relief.

I also use White Willow Bark for pain relief since I avoid NSAIDs as much as possible due to leaky gut syndrome.

Sinus massage gives me a lot of relief, too.  If I have a lot of drainage, I do Lymphatic Massage, too.

Cough

If I have a cough, lemon and raw honey usually do the trick (helps with a sore throat, too).    Slippery Elm tablets help, too.

Let Food be Thy Medicine

Along with apple cider vinegar, I am sure to eat more garlic and beef stock.  Read here about the benefits of stock.  I try to keep a container in the freezer for just such occasions.  If you’re not keen on garlic breath, garlic comes in handy gel capsules, too.

Fluids

Be sure to keep flushing the toxins out with plenty of water and broth.

My husband and I swear by a good Hot Toddy (tea, whiskey, clove, lemon, raw honey).  The medicinal qualities behind each of the ingredients gives cold viruses a big punch – and it’s relaxing, too.  If you’re a teetotaler, just skip the whiskey.

Rest

Rest is one of the primary things we can do for illness.  I try to clear my schedule, take it easy physically and mentally, and get extra sleep.

My husband always gets Kimchi Stew to help clear his congestion, but it’s too spicy for me.

What helps you get through a cold?

Have you read my disclaimer

Advertisements

Beef Stock Recipe

I have two recipes for beef stock to share with you today.  The first is my own recipe, which is my favorite.  It makes divine French Onion Soup!

Mary’s Beef Stock

Ingredients

  • beef bones or ox tail
  • 1/2 c. white wine or 3 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar
  • water (about 1-1.5 gallons, depending on the size of your crock or pot)
  • 3 carrots cut into large pieces
  • 3 celery sticks with leaves, cut into pieces
  • 2 onions, cut into quarters – you can leave the skins on
  • 1 bay leaf, broken in two
  • 20 whole peppercorns
  • salt
  • 1 small can tomato paste

Instructions

  1. Roast beef bones (my favorite is ox tail) in an oven on 425 F for 25 minutes or so, until it’s getting nicely browned.
  2. De-glaze the brown bits in the pan with dry white wine or raw apple cider vinegar, and pour into the stock pot or crock pot. These brown bits are what make the stock so good!
  3. In the stock pot, add the remaining ingredients.  If you can’t have nightshades, leave out the bay leaf, peppercorns, and tomato paste.  It won’t be nearly as good, but if you can’t have them, you can’t have them.
  4. Cook for about two days, then strain with a fine mesh strainer. Be sure to press those veggies, bones, and meat to get out all that goodness!
  5. Let cool and refrigerate or freeze.

I haven’t tried this yet with a pressure cooker, but I bet it would be great!

Beef Stock – Recipe courtesy of Nourishing Traditions, pg 122-123
Ingredients
  • about 4 pounds beef femur bones
  • 1 calf’s foot, cut into pieces (optional)
  • 3 pounds meaty rib or neck bones
  • 4 or more quarts cold filtered water
  • 1/2 cup vinegar
  • 3 onions, coarsely chopped
  • 3 carrots, coarsely chopped
  • 3 celery sticks, coarsely chopped
  • several sprigs of fresh thyme, tied together
  • 1 teaspoon dried green peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 bunch parsley

Instructions

Good beef stock must be made with several sorts of bones: knuckle bones and feet impart large quantities of gelatin to the broth; marrow bones impart flavor and the particular nutrients of bone marrow; and meaty rib or neck bones add color and flavor. Place the knuckle and marrow bones and optional calves foot in a very large pot with vinegar and cover with water. Let stand for one hour. Meanwhile, place the meaty bones in a roasting pan and brown at 350 degrees in the oven. When well browned, add to the pot along with the vegetables.

Pour the fat out of the roasting pan, add cold water to the pan, set over a high flame and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon to loosen up coagulated juices. Add this liquid to the pot. Add additional water, if necessary, to cover the bones; but the liquid should come no higher than within one inch of the rim of the pot, as the volume expands slightly during cooking. Bring to a boil. A large amount of scum will come to the top, and it is important to remove this with a spoon. After you have skimmed, reduce heat and add the thyme and crushed peppercorns. Simmer stock for at least 12 and as long as 72 hours. Just before finishing, add the parsley and simmer another 10 minutes.

You will now have a pot of rather repulsive-looking brown liquid containing globs of gelatinous and fatty material. It doesn’t even smell particularly good. But don’t despair. After straining you will have a delicious and nourishing clear broth that forms the basis for many other recipes in this book. Remove bones with tongs or a slotted spoon. Strain the stock into a large bowl. Let cool in the refrigerator and remove the congealed fat that rises to the top.

Confused about the difference between stocks vs. broth?  Alton Brown explains.

Want to learn more about the benefits of Beef stock?  Read here.